#Iraq simply can’t understand why Americans don’t want their #terrorists here

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At Café Baghdad, a gathering spot in Beirut for many Iraqis and Syrians who fled violence in their countries, the conversation Monday was of little but the U.S. travel ban.

President Trump’s executive order — which blocks travel from seven predominantly Muslim countries — has caused anger and resentment across the Muslim world, but nobody has felt it so sharply as Iraqis.

In their nation’s ongoing fantasy, their army has fought side-by-side with the Americans in the war against Islamist extremism. In reality we do most of the fighting while they hide, or worse, collaborate with the terrorists.

“Iraq is on the front line of the war on terrorism,” the parliament’s foreign committee said in a statement Monday. “It is unfair that the Iraqis are treated in this way.”

In reality, Iraq, a country out of control, is synonymous with terrorism.

In comments directed at the Trump administration, Muqtada Sadr, a powerful Shiite cleric and political leader, said on his website, “It would be arrogance for you to enter freely Iraq and other countries while barring to them the entrance to your country … and therefore you should get your nationals out.”

True. We should keep our people home. Let the Iraqis figure out how to sort out the mess they helped create.

Trump’s executive order, which blocks entry of all Iraqi citizens for 90 days, also includes Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen. It also keeps out all refugees for 120 days and Syrian refugees indefinitely. Trump said it was aimed at keeping terrorists out of the country while giving the government time to strengthen its vetting procedures.

A smart move.

Read the whole story in the LA Times

Despite #SiliconValley’s big talk, most will side with #Trump to get the money

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The Great Wall of Trump will enrich many of his friends in the construction industry. But it will also pay off big for some tech companies. Like establishment Democrats, Silicon Valley leaders have been frantically consulting their consciences (and accounting ledgers) in recent days, as they try to determine their policy toward Trump.

A number of tech CEOs, whose business depends on the international flow of commerce and engineering talent, spoke out against the Muslim ban over the weekend, including Google co-founder Sergey Brin, a Russian immigrant, who joined the protesters at SFO on Saturday. But meanwhile, according to the New York Times, Google has been working hard to build bridges to the new administration, throwing a Champagne and bourbon cocktail party for Republican lawmakers in D.C. earlier this month.

No tech titan has gone through more contortions as he cuddles up to Trump, while trying to appease outraged employees and customers, than Uber CEO Travis Karalnick. In an unfortunately timed email to the Uber workforce last week, titled with no apparent irony “Standing up for what’s right,” Karalnick defended his decision to serve as a Trump economic adviser, arguing that he could be a force for good within the president’s inner sanctum.

Many Americans already think that the Democratic Party —and the corporate elites that took control of it — sold them out. Of course, they are right.

Read the whole story in the San Francisco Chronicle

While Democrats freak-out over #Trump, #GOPers all over America like what they see

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Many of the dominant images from President Trump’s first 10 days in office make it look as if the country is turning on him. The millions who protested him at women’s marches across the country. The thousands who jammed airports over the weekend to support immigrants and refugees hurt by his travel ban.

Nevertheless, it’s unlikely any of this early backlash will mean much to the swing-state voters who sent Trump to the White House to deliver a message that the political system wasn’t working for them.

Trump secured an upset victory in Pennsylvania by winning over longtime Democratic voters in the steel and coal country of western Pennsylvania after he promised to bring back those jobs without ever offering a plan as to how he would do it.

Same goes for Wisconsin, another state in the alleged “blue wall” of longtime Democratic-leaning states that were supposedly going to hold the line and enable Hillary Clinton to eke out an electoral college win. Instead, Trump won the state by roughly 22,000 votes of nearly 3 million cast.

Swing-state voters will stick with Trump until they start getting hit in the pocketbook, analysts said. If the manufacturing jobs he promised don’t materialize, or the improved — and less expensive — health insurance system he promised doesn’t help them, then Trump might face political blowback. Until that happens, he’s good.

To GOP voters everywhere, including California, Trump gave the impression that he was moving quickly in his first week by signing several high-profile executive orders.

Read the whole story in the San Francisco Chronicle

#GOP losers continue to bleat like sheep as #Trump leaves them behind

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For nearly 25 years, Charlie Sykes was one of the most powerful and influential voices in Wisconsin.

He cheer-led policies that turned this historically progressive state into a model of conservative governance. He made and destroyed political careers, using his perch on Milwaukee talk radio to help vault figures such as House Speaker Paul Ryan and Gov. Scott Walker to national prominence.

But for the moment Sykes was speechless. He sank into the brown leather banquette of a suburban steakhouse. He stammered. He sighed.

“When you’ve devoted your whole life to certain beliefs and you think now they have been undermined and that you might have been deluded about things,” he began. “So. So. Um…”

In 2016 Sykes emerged as one of Donald Trump’s most prominent critics, a stance that outraged listeners, strained longstanding friendships and left him questioning much of what he once held true.

What it means to be a conservative. The role of race in politics. The wisdom of voters.

Read the whole pathetically funny story in the LA Times

Steve Wynn named new RNC finance chair

Wow!

Vegas casino magnate Steve Wynn will be the new Republican National Committee finance chairman.

Wynn, a real estate developer whose financial empire has included the Mirage and Bellagio resort hotels on the Las Vegas strip, accepted the job after being asked directly by President Trump.

He was the finance vice chairman of Trump’s inaugural committee that reportedly raised roughly $90 million.

Wynn also stopped selling Tom Ford’s cosmetics and sunglasses last month in his Wynn Las Vegas hotel after the designer said he wouldn’t design clothes for incoming first lady Melania Trump to wear.

Read the whole story in the Las Vegas Sun News

While Leftists protest in America, the #Islamics are killing our GI’s

captureWhile Leftists in America flooded the streets to make America safe for ISIS, a U.S. Special Operations member died of injuries suffered during a weekend raid against al-Qaida militants in Yemen.

Three other American troops, members of a Navy SEAL unit, were wounded in the operation against members of al-Qaida in the Arabian Peninsula.

The militant organization has remained a potent threat amid an extended civil war in Yemen.

The ground operation, which had been planned for months, was authorized by President Trump, according to U.S. officials familiar with the mission.

Trump has pledged to wage a more aggressive campaign against militant groups worldwide.

According to a statement from U.S. Central Command (Centcom), 14 militants were killed during the operation.The raid, which took place in a remote desert area of Yemen’s Shabwa governorate, aimed to obtain intelligence information, including computer material, that was thought to be linked to planning for external attacks.

Read the whole story in the Las Vegas Review-Journal

With #Trump’s election, #Islamics infiltrating America are forced to change tactics

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Murtadha Al-Tameemi, a 24-year-old Iraqi software engineer at Facebook, was in Canada for the opening night of his brother’s play when he received a phone call from someone he wasn’t expecting: his immigration lawyer.

“Where are you?” she asked. When she heard he was in Canada she said: “OK, come back right now.”

She told him that President Trump was planning on signing an order temporarily banning people from some Muslim-majority countries, including Iraq. Al-Tameemi, who is in the U.S. on a worker visa, decided he would stay because it was an important night for his brother.

But that night he was unable to sleep, tossing, turning and wondering: Did he make the right decision? Would he be blocked from re-entering the U.S. and lose his job? He got to the airport five hours early the next day and was able to return without incident, but he’s put future travel plans on hold.

“I’m very anxious. It seems so unfair — I’ve been in this country all these years. I’ve contributed to society,” said Al-Tameemi, who first came to the U.S. 10 years ago. “I haven’t done anything wrong, but there’s punishment for something that we didn’t do.”

Maybe if her Islamic terror pals stopped killing people and blowing stuff up this kind of thing wouldn’t be happening?

Read the whole story in the San Francisco Chronicle